Scott Safadi Discusses Seasonal Market Fluctuations

Scott Safadi would like to draw people’s attention to the seasonal fluctuations that exist in the rental market. Between the months of October and February, prospective renters can expect to find more inventory, better deals, and often, even promotions, which are unheard of during the peak summer months.

Scott Safadi judges the strength of then market in two ways. The first is by rental growth, which primarily occurs over the course of the peak season, as landlords are lucky to even maintain their peak September rents through the course of the winter months. The second way that Scott Safadi judges the strength of the rental market is by the extremity of the slowdown during the winter months. There are always people looking for apartments in the summer months, regardless of the market conditions, however, the margins are on what happens during the slow season.

Scott Safadi believes that a robust winter rental market is a sign of a stable and vibrant rental market. Scott Safadi would rather see a strong winter market than double digit growth over the summer months, as one is an indicator of a potential boom bust situation, while the other represents stability and consistency, something that all landlords should want.

In closing, Scott Safadi believes that sometimes it is better to monitor exactly how bad the bad times are rather than just focusing on how good the good times are. In the context of an economy that has shown itself quite susceptible to huge booms and even bigger busts, it’s good to measure the baseline, which in our world is the winter rental season.

So far, the 2014 slow season has shown itself to be reasonably robust, a very good sign.

Scott Safadi has managed apartments throughout the California Bay Area for over a decade. He exclusively manages properties with 16 or more units.

Scott Safadi discussed education

Scott Safadi has noticed that the Ivy League and other pricey institutions have come under increased scrutiny as a poor investment. The argument is that the more costly institutions do not increase your odds of producing more wealth over the course of ones life. Instead, graduates are simply left with a higher debt load and an education that could be impractical in the professional world, considering the liberal arts focus of most Ivy League institutions.

Scott Safadi believes that this argument misses the point. College is not all about return on your investment. It is not a means to an end. Instead, College is valuable in and of itself. The end is one of personal growth, surrounded by the best and brightest. There is much to be said about being average amongst a sea of superstars, as opposed to being the smartest kid in every classroom. It is a humbling experience and one that promotes hard work.

Scott Safadi believes that if one demands that college be a means to an end, one should consider that you will be part of a large network of highly educated peers for the rest of your life. This can prove beneficially socially and in your career. Nevertheless, Scott Safadi believes that college should be seen as a special experience and one should attend the most challenging institution that will take them.

Scott Safadi on the Merits of his Alma Mater, Dartmouth College

Scott SafadiScott Safadi is the President of Cal Bay Property Management. He holds a CCRM (California Certified Resident Manager) designation. Involved in property management since 2005, Scott Safadi has made Silicon Valley apartment communities the primary focus of his work.

Scott Safadi received his BA degree from Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire in 2003. Dartmouth College was the first choice of Scott Safadi and he was thrilled when he received his acceptance letter from the prestigious college. Scott Safadi states that the resulting Dartmouth experience transformed his life.

According to Scott Safadi, Dartmouth College is a coeducational, four-year, Liberal Arts College. It was granted a charter in 1769 by King George III. The college was named for the Second Earl of Dartmouth, William Legge. Scott Safadi explains that Dartmouth is the country’s ninth oldest college and is considered one of the most innovative small liberal arts colleges in the United States. Dartmouth’s sports teams compete in NCAA Division I-AA athletics and are nicknamed the Big Green.

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Scott Safadi Discusses Technology and Property Management

Scott SafadiAs the owner of Cal Bay Property Management in the Silicon Valley area, Scott Safadi is well aware of the fact that his tenants are some of the most tech-savvy people anywhere. Scott Safadi sees no reason that a landlord or property management company shouldn’t be ahead of the curve as well.

Q: So, does anyone in property management in your area still do things the old way—phone calls, letters, paper maintenance requests and such?

Scott Safadi: Of course they do. A lot of people have a hard time adapting to change.

Q: What is it that you’re doing that’s so much different?

Scott Safadi: Well, we’ve gone over to doing a lot of things through ACH, Automated Clearing House. That means a lot less paperwork and a lot less trouble and inconvenience for us and our tenants both.

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Scott Safadi Discusses the Fair Housing Act

Scott SafadiAs President of CPBM (Cal Bay Property Management), Scott Safadi has been in the property management business since 2005. Based in the Silicon Valley, apartment communities are CPBM’s main stock in trade; Scott Safadi has been designated a California Certified Resident Manager.

Q: What exactly is the Fair Housing Act?

Scott Safadi: The Fair Housing Act prevents discrimination based on religion, race or nationality. In addition, it protects against retaliation towards fair-housing advocates. It now includes protections against discrimination based on sex, or families with children or the disabled.

Q: What can you tell us about the basics of the fair housing laws?

Scott Safadi: What it really comes down to is that applicants and tenants receive equal, objective treatment, without bias. That sounds simple, but the legal terminology starts to get a little more complex.

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Scott Safadi Gives a Brief Explanation of Disc Golf

Scott SafadiScott Safadi first played disc golf many years ago, and he remains intrigued by the unique challenge of this growing game. Disc golf is an enjoyable physical activity that can be played by individuals of all athletic levels and ages. By inviting family members, friends and colleagues to join him on the course, he continues to develop relationships while enjoying some exercise in a competitive, but fun pursuit.

The object of disc golf is to toss a disc into a metal basket that is adorned with chains. Scott Safadi explains that these chains are constructed so that the players are able to land the disc in the basket. Disc golf rewards a certain amount of creative flair. There are four major throwing styles: forehand, backhand, Tomahawk, and roller. Scott Safadi notes that some players use very creative methods of tossing the disc. The most entertaining throw might be the Tomahawk, where the player uses an overhead motion to launch the disc towards the desired target. The discs, which are smaller and lighter than most traditional models, typically fall into one of three categories: driver, putter, and mid-range.

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Scott Safadi Describes Unlikely Journey in Pursuit of the American Dream

Scott SafadiQ: How did your journey from Syria to America start?

Scott Safadi: It started in Damascus, Syria, which is now in the midst of a civil war. At the age of 2, my family relocated to the U.S. to start a new life. One of my uncles had previously made the same move to pursue a career in engineering. Mom and Dad separated soon after the move, which was a difficult decision for both of them. A major supporter during this time was my Dad’s mother, who followed shortly after their separation in order to help around the house.

Q: What was it like to acclimate to American culture?

Scott Safadi: Our family moved around California often during these years. Since my family wasn’t fluent in English, I learned the language listening to the characters on Sesame Street. During my middle school years, Dad allowed me to change my name from the Syrian “Ghais” to “Scott,” since my given name “Ghais” was quite difficult for Americans to pronounce.

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